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Dean Guida
President, CEO
ProtoView Development

JDJ: Can you give us an idea of what you have to offer and what you have out on the market?
Guida: ProtoView has been in the component market for over 10 years now. We started off with ActiveX components, and about two and a half years ago we got into building Java components for professional developers. Right now we are providing a lot of GUI components, and we just came to market with the JFCSuite, a package of GUI components that create added value for the JDK 1.2 and, as some of us know it, the Swing Tool Set. We found a lot of missing holes in the package. For example, we are geared toward professional businesses so we created some currency components, time, date, and we focus a lot on the richness of creating some very visual effects. We have a very graphical calendar with over a hundred different properties that you can set through the customizer. We really focused on an easy API to program, snap-in components, the reuse of it, and providing the missing holes in the JFC.

In our JFCSuite we feel probably the biggest component in there is our JFCDataExplorer, and that metaphor came over from the Windows platform where you are seeing a lot of this Explorer metaphor. We have the left-hand pane of a tree view, the right-hand pane being a container that could be anything, a panel, another component, a calendar. So as you are clicking on nodes in this left-hand pane of the tree, you are displaying some data input screens or other types of components in the right-hand pane with a splitter bar. What ProtoView did was to take the base JFC classes of the tree and the table in there and we put it together into one coupled component, integrating these two with some advanced data model views to make it simple to add data to it through this architecture and giving that familiar user interface of the JFC look and feel.

Dean Guida
President, CEO
ProtoView Development

JDJ: Who would you consider your biggest customer base? Mainly for the enterprise, or can someone who is just starting out with Java or a similar language jump into something like that?
Guida: When they finally buy a ProtoView component, they are usually a professional developer solving business problems. They are getting paid to solve a problem and have already chosen Java to solve these problems. They usually don't come to us until a specific problem arises. Really, we are having developers when they buy our product...it is not an IDE where they are learning it as they go. ProtoView customers are actually at a point where they need to solve some problems and they have to go outside their current box, be it Visual Cafe, JBuilder, Visual Age, etc.... Our developers range from a one-man consulting company to your Fortune 100 companies.

JDJ: What do you foresee in the near future for Java and the entire Java industry.
Guida: We are very excited about the Java industry. As a company we provide added-value components, so we are actually creating ActiveX, architecture-type components and Java components. We are having some very large companies deploy enterprise-type systems with either or both of our components. We only see Java growing and maturing. Right now everyone talks about Web applications and Web technologies, but soon it is just going to be about application development. The lines are going to go away and we will begin to see pure software development; regardless of the platform or technology used to solve the problem. I think Java is going to be the cornerstone of that. So it is really - it is computing, it is software..

 

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